The Duke of Edinburgh’s Hillary Award is a global non-formal education framework

Adventurous Journey – Taranaki Falls

Who We Are

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Hillary Award is a global non-formal education framework, with more than 60 years of experience challenging young people to dream big and discover their potential.

 

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Te Tiriti

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Hillary Award is committed to upholding the mana of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.  The Award is at the first milestone in our journey towards building a Te Tiriti-led organisation and bicultural future, with the introduction of the recently launched He Aratūtahi pathway.

Created in partnership with the National Māori Authority, He Aratūtahi enables Award participants to choose Award activities with a Te Ao Māori focus; enabling the exploration of identity and the cultural significance of Te Ao Māori and Tikanga. Our recent MOU with the National Māori Authority helps the Award in its Te Tiriti journey not just in delivery, but the development of our bi-cultural journey to be a good Treaty partner.

The Award is open to anyone between the ages of 14 to 24 – regardless of gender, background or ability and is run throughout Aotearoa, in schools, community groups and organisations such as Cadets and Scouts New Zealand. Our participants design their own Award programmes, pick activities they’re passionate about, set their own goals and record their own progress. With the guidance of dedicated Award Leaders (adults), Approved Activity Providers and Award Units, participants are given the opportunity to carve a positive future for themselves - with the support of our Award Whānau.

By creating opportunities for rangatahi to discover or develop a skill, get physically active, give back to their communities, and take part in an adventure, the Award challenges young people to leave their comfort zones – and that's when the great stuff happens. Our participants build self-confidence and greater resilience, helping to set them up for success in today's uncertain world, where they face more challenges than ever.

How does it work?

Mount Maunganui, New Zealand

History


    1956

    HRH Prince Philip and Kurt Hahn founded the Award.

    1960 – 1963

    Two organisations, the Boy’s Brigade and the Y.M.C.A. and one boys’ school licensed direct from the United Kingdom to do the Award.

    1962

    Stuart Hobbs became the first New Zealander to receive the Gold Award (through the UK license).

    25 May 1961

    A committee for the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme for Girls formed in Christchurch, with Mrs. C. H. Beach and Chairman. A pilot scheme was initiated.

    19 July 1963

    • The Duke of Edinburgh's Award in New Zealand is launched and has its first council meeting at Government House, Wellington hosted and chaired by the Governor General Sir Bernard Fergusson with Mr. P. Proctor, C.B.E. as National Co-ordinator.
    • The award is for boys 14-19 and girls 14-20.
    • The committee for the Girl's Award becomes the Girls' Advisory Sub-Committee of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award in New Zealand.
    • Brigadier J.R. Page, C.B.E., D.S.O. appointed first General Secretary.

    11 August 1964

    Michael Menzies of the New Plymouth Scouts is the first young man to complete the Gold Award through the New Zealand scheme.

    1 April 1965

    Margaret McHugh of the Dunedin Guides is the first young woman to complete the Gold Award through the New Zealand scheme.

    29 May 1965

    First Gold Award presentation at government House, with Governor-General Sir Bernard Fergusson.

    1968

    Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.

    1969

    • The age limits for both boys and girls changed to 14-21 years.
    • Mr. P.T. Norman appointed National Co-ordinator.
    • Brigadier W.R.K. Morrison, D.S.O., O.B.E. appointed General Secretary.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.

    1970

    • The Girls’ Advisory Committee became the National Advisory Committee.
    • Award link between New Zealand and Fiji, and New Zealand and Western Samoa established.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.
    • Price Philip presented with a greyhound, ‘Royal Commission’; he kindly asked that its winnings should be donated to the Award Scheme.

    1971

    Prince Philip’s greyhound, ‘Royal Commission’ brings in $120.

    1972

    • Prince Philip’s greyhound, ‘Royal Commission’ brings in $280.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.

    1973

    • The upper age of participation in the Award extends to 25.
    • Price Philip’s greyhound, ‘Royal Commission’ is withdrawn from racing to mother her puppies, after bringing in $101.

    1975

    • Moves made to make the Award conditions equal in demand for young men and women by providing the same choices for both sexes.
    • Sir Patrick O’Dea K.C.V.O. appointed National Co-ordinator.

    1977

    Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh. Gold presentation on board the ‘Britannia’ in Auckland.

    1980

    First New Zealand-produced handbooks and record books. Until now these were imported from London.

    1981

    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Prince of Wales. (April) who presented Gold Awards during the tour
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh. (October)

    1985

    Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.

    1986

    • Colonel James Brown, C.V.O. appointed General Secretary.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Prince Edward.

    1988 – Silver Jubilee Year

    HRH Prince Philip establishes a World Fellowship for the Award.

    1989

    New Zealand Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Foundation established.

    1990

    • NZ hosted the International Gold Award-holders Training course (IGAT) with 70 participants from 13 countries.
    • NZ hosted the Award’s first Pacific Regional Conference with delegates from 5 nations.
    • Colin Clere appointed as National Co-ordinator and as new Chair.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh and HRH the Prince Edward.

    1993 – 30th Anniversary

    New logo confirmed: A Challenge to Youth – Wero Ki Te Rangatahi

    1994

    Glenn Duncan is first Executive Director appointed

    June 1994

    • Link into ‘Internet’ first proposed. (Didn’t happen in the end because sponsorship was declined)
    • The Global Bird is introduced.

    1995

    New look logo introduced.

    November 1995

    Royal tour: visit of HRH the Duke of Edinburgh.

    August 1996

    First web page developed; launched that October.

    1997

    • Bryan Johnson appointed Chair of the National Council
    • International Forum hosted by New Zealand. Delegates from 50 countries come to Wellington.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh and HRH the Prince Edward.

    27 June 2001

    • National Council of The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award in New Zealand dissolved.
    • Reconstituted as Board of Trustees.
    • Chair – Bryan Johnson
    • Dudley Hewitt appointed Executive Director

    13 June 2001

    Change from Wero Ki Te Rangatahi to Wero Ki Te Taiohi first discussed.

    22 August 2001

    Dual branding introduced: The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award / The Young New Zealanders’ Challenge.

    March 2002

    First website launch

    2003

    • Andrew Meehan Chair of the Board of Trustees
    • Guy Ockenden appointed Executive Director

    2004

    • Kevin Plant appointed Executive Director
    • Royal tour: visit of HRH the Earl of Wessex.

    20 August 2009

    • Launch of name change to The Duke of Edinburgh’s Hillary Award
    • Royal tour: visit of HRH the Earl of Wessex.

    2013

    50th Anniversary celebrations

    2014

      Online Record Book (ORB) introduced.
    • Amanda Lawson from Chilton St James School was the first Gold Award to be approved in the Online record Book, signed off by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh.
    • Chris Luoni appointed Chair of the Board of Trustees

    2015

    Prue Kelly appointed Chair of the Board of Trustees

    2016

    Karen Ross appointed National Director

    17 May 2017

    Moved to international branding.

    2018

    • Online Record Book Version Two launched – all registrations now on line
    • Ken Hames appointed Chair
    • Major Award digital transformation commenced through Salesforce

    2020

    • First Social Analysis Impact Research Report, annually subsequently
    • Kākāriki Pathway launched to complete Award activity with an emphasis on environment, sustainability or conservation
    • All Award completion certificates and badges issued digitally
    • All Award leaders certified and accredited digitally

    2022

    • Te reo Māori translation of the Award name introduced: Te Tohu Aonui a Te Tiuka o Erinipua | Te Paraihe o Hillary Aotearoa.
    • He Aratūtahi Pathway launched to complete the Award activity in te ao and /or tikanga
    • New website launched

    2023

    • Emma Brown appointed National Director
    • 60th Anniversary celebrations

    1956

    HRH Prince Philip and Kurt Hahn founded the Award.
    ImageImage

    1960 – 1963

    Two organisations, the Boy’s Brigade and the Y.M.C.A. and one boys’ school licensed direct from the United Kingdom to do the Award.

    1962

    Stuart Hobbs became the first New Zealander to receive the Gold Award (through the UK license).

    25 May 1961

    A committee for the Award for Girls formed in Christchurch, with Mrs. C. H. Beach and Chairman. A pilot scheme was initiated.
    ImageImage

    19 July 1963

    • The Award in New Zealand is launched and has its first council meeting at Government House, Wellington hosted and chaired by the Governor General Sir Bernard Fergusson with Mr. P. Proctor, C.B.E. as National Co-ordinator.
    • The award is for boys 14-19 and girls 14-20.
    • The committee for the Girl's Award becomes the Girls' Advisory Sub-Committee of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award in New Zealand.
    • Brigadier J.R. Page, C.B.E., D.S.O. appointed first General Secretary.
    Image

    11 August 1964

    Michael Menzies of the New Plymouth Scouts is the first young man to complete the Gold Award through the New Zealand scheme.
    Image

    1 April 1965

    Margaret McHugh of the Dunedin Guides is the first young woman to complete the Gold Award through the New Zealand scheme.
    Image

    29 May 1965

    First Gold Award presentation at government House, with Governor-General Sir Bernard Fergusson.
    Image

    1968

    Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.

    1969

    • The age limits for both boys and girls changed to 14-21 years.
    • Mr. P.T. Norman appointed National Co-ordinator.
    • Brigadier W.R.K. Morrison, D.S.O., O.B.E. appointed General Secretary.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.
    Image

    1970

    • The Girls’ Advisory Committee became the National Advisory Committee.
    • Award link between New Zealand and Fiji, and New Zealand and Western Samoa established.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.
    • Prince Philip presented with a greyhound, ‘Royal Commission’; he kindly asked that its winnings should be donated to the Award Scheme.

    1971

    Prince Philip’s greyhound, ‘Royal Commission’ brings in $120.
    Image

    1972

    • Prince Philip’s greyhound, ‘Royal Commission’ brings in $280.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.
    Image

    1973

    • The upper age of participation in the Award extends to 25.
    • Prince Philip’s greyhound, ‘Royal Commission’ is withdrawn from racing to mother her puppies, after bringing in $101.

    1975

    • Moves made to make the Award conditions equal in demand for young men and women by providing the same choices for both sexes.
    • Sir Patrick O’Dea K.C.V.O. appointed National Co-ordinator.

    1977

    Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh. Gold presentation on board the ‘Britannia’ in Auckland.

    1980

    First New Zealand-produced handbooks and record books. Until now these were imported from London.
    Image

    1981

    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Prince of Wales. (April) who presented Gold Awards during the tour
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh. (October)

    1985

    Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.

    1986

    • Colonel James Brown, C.V.O. appointed General Secretary.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Prince Edward.

    1988 – Silver Jubilee Year

    HRH Prince Philip establishes a World Fellowship for the Award.
    Image

    1989

    New Zealand Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Foundation established.

    1990

    • NZ hosted the International Gold Award-holders Training course (IGAT) with 70 participants from 13 countries.
    • NZ hosted the Award’s first Pacific Regional Conference with delegates from 5 nations.
    • Colin Clere appointed as National Co-ordinator and as new Chair.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh and HRH the Prince Edward.
    Image

    1993 – 30th Anniversary

    New logo confirmed: A Challenge to Youth – Wero Ki Te Rangatahi
    ImageImage

    1994

    Glenn Duncan is first Executive Director appointed

    June 1994

    • Link into ‘Internet’ first proposed. (Didn’t happen in the end because sponsorship was declined)
    • The Global Bird is introduced.
    ImageImage

    1995

    New look logo introduced.
    Image

    November 1995

    Royal tour: visit of HRH the Duke of Edinburgh.

    August 1996

    First web page developed; launched that October.

    1997

    • Bryan Johnson appointed Chair of the National Council
    • International Forum hosted by New Zealand. Delegates from 50 countries come to Wellington.
    • Royal tour: visit of H.R.H the Duke of Edinburgh and HRH the Prince Edward.

    27 June 2001

    • National Council of The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award in New Zealand dissolved.
    • Reconstituted as Board of Trustees.
    • Chair – Bryan Johnson
    • Dudley Hewitt appointed Executive Director

    13 June 2001

    Change from Wero Ki Te Rangatahi to Wero Ki Te Taiohi first discussed.

    22 August 2001

    Dual branding introduced: The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award / The Young New Zealanders’ Challenge.

    March 2002

    First website launch

    2003

    • Andrew Meehan Chair of the Board of Trustees
    • Guy Ockenden appointed Executive Director

    2004

    • Kevin Plant appointed Executive Director
    • Royal tour: visit of HRH the Earl of Wessex.

    20 August 2009

    • Launch of name change to The Duke of Edinburgh’s Hillary Award
    • Royal tour: visit of HRH the Earl of Wessex.
    ImageImage

    2013

    50th Anniversary celebrations
    Image

    2014

    • Online Record Book (ORB) introduced.
    • Amanda Lawson from Chilton St James School was the first Gold Award to be approved in the Online record Book, signed off by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh.
    • Chris Luoni appointed Chair of the Board of Trustees

    2015

    Prue Kelly appointed Chair of the Board of Trustees

    2016

    Karen Ross appointed National Director

    17 May 2017

    Moved to international branding.
    Image

    2018

    • Online Record Book Version Two launched – all registrations now on line
    • Ken Hames appointed Chair
    • Major Award digital transformation commenced through Salesforce

    2020

    • First Social Analysis Impact Research Report, annually subsequently
    • Kākāriki Pathway launched to complete Award activity with an emphasis on environment, sustainability or conservation
    • All Award completion certificates and badges issued digitally
    • All Award leaders certified and accredited digitally

    2022

    • Te reo Māori translation of the Award name introduced: Te Tohu Aonui a Te Tiuka o Erinipua | Te Paraihe o Hillary Aotearoa.
    • He Aratūtahi Pathway launched to complete the Award activity in te ao and /or tikanga
    • New website launched

    2023

    • Emma Brown appointed National Director
    • 60th Anniversary celebrations